The accidental constitution: the making of Europe's constitutional treaty

The accidental constitution: the making of Europe's constitutional treaty

The accidental constitution: the making of Europe's constitutional treaty

Law of Europe > Europe. Organization and integration law > Regional organization and integration (Europe) > The European Communities. Community law > Organization law. Constitution of the European Communities > Treaties establishing and expanding the communities. Basic law > Individual treaties > Treaty of Paris, 1951. Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community (Montan-Union) > Texts of, and works on, the treaty > KJE4443

Edition Details

  • Creator or Attribution (Responsibility): Peter Norman
  • Language: English
  • Jurisdiction(s): Belgium
  • Publication Information: Brussels : EuroComment, ©2005
  • Publication Type (Medium): History
  • Material: Internet resource
  • Type: Book, Internet Resource
  • Permalink: http://books.lawlegal.eu/the-accidental-constitution-the-making-of-europe-s-constitutional-treaty/ (Stable identifier)

Additional Format

Online version: Norman, Peter, 1947- Accidental constitution. Brussels: EuroComment, ©2005 (OCoLC)763129668

Short Description

XIV, 324 pages, [8] pages of plates : ILlustrations ; 24 cm

Purpose and Intended Audience

Useful for students learning an area of law, The accidental constitution: the making of Europe's constitutional treaty is also useful for lawyers seeking to apply the law to issues arising in practice.

Research References

  • Providing references to further research sources: Search

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Bibliographic information

  • Responsable Person: Peter Norman.
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Copyright Date: 2005
  • Location: Brussels
  • Country/State: Belgium
  • Number of Editions: 19 editions
  • First edition Date: 2003
  • Last edition Date: 2005
  • General Notes: Includes index.
  • Languages: English, French
  • Library of Congress Code: KJE4443
  • Dewey Code: 341.242
  • ISBN: 9077110089 9789077110089
  • OCLC: 60613505

Main Contents

A new way to reform the Union
Pressures for change
Setting up the convention
early days
Working groups and constitutions
The issues : broad constitutional questions
Who does what and how? Competences and their implementation
New or expanding policy areas
The institutions
The member states awake and the Commission confuses
Divisions among the member states
The Praesidium produces
Institutional imbroglio
The revised draft constitution
Managing the splits
Countdown to consensus
The convention after Thessaloniki
The intergovernmental Conference
The challenge of ratification
'A Constitution for Europe'.

Table of Contents

CHAPTERreface IX
Note on Sources XII
PART I
Setting up the Convention
1. A New Way to Reform the Union…3
2. Pressure for Change…6
2.1 The U ncertain Giant – 6

2.2 A New Debate on Europe's Future – 12

3. Setting up the Convention – 17

3.1 The Nice and Laeken Agendas for Europe – 17

3.2 The Choice of a Convention – 21

3.3 The Convention Triumvirate – 23

3.4 The Praesidium Forms – 27

3.5 Building the Secretariat – 31

3.6 The Conventionnels – 33

4. Early D ays – 35

4.1 Difficulties After Laeken – 35

4.2 The Opening Ceremony – 38

4.3 The Listening Phase – 40

4.4 Movers and Shakers – 43

4.5 The Listening Phase: An Evaluation – 46

4.6 Giscard's Bilateral Diplomacy – 48

4.7 Giscard's Early Performance – 49

5. Working Groups and Constitutions…51
5.1 Setting Up the Working Groups – 51

5.2 The Praesidium Ponders Constitutional Options – 54

5.3 The Skeleton – 56

PART II
Issues and Working Groups
6. The Issues: Broad Constitutional Questions…63
6.1 A Constitution or a Constitutional Treaty?… 63
6.2 The Union's Values and Objectives – 65

6.3 Religion and the Constitution – 66

6.4 The Legal Personality and the End of the Pillars – 67

6.5 The Charter of Fundamental Rights – 68

7. Who Does What and How? Competences and their Implementation
.. 72
7.1 Competences: The Respective Roles of Union and Member
States – 72

7.2 Subsidiarity and its Monitoring – 75

7.3 The Role of National Parliaments – 78

7.4 The Exercise of Power – 80

7.5 The Union's Finances – 85

8. New or Expanding Policy Areas…88
8.1 Common Foreign and Security Policy – 88

8.2 D efence – 94

8.3 The Area of Freedom, Security and Justice – 98

8.4 Economic Governance – 101

8.5 Social Europe – 104

8.6 The Legacy of the Working Groups – 106

9. The Institutions…108
9.1 Big and Small – 109

9.2 A President for the Union?… 110
9.3 The Foreign Minister – 113

9.4 The Council of Ministers and Qualified Majorities – 116

9.5 The Commission – 118

9.6 The European Parliament – 122

9.7 The Congress – 122

9.8 The Court of Justice and Other Institutions – 123

9.9 Giscard and the Institutional Debate – 124

PART III
Changing Dynamics: From Skeleton to Early Draft Articles
10. The Member States Awake and the Commission Confuses 129
10.1 The Invasion of Foreign Ministers – 129

10.2 The Franco-German Motor Starts to Turn – 133

10.3 The Commission and Penelope – 135

10.4 Benelux Defends the Community Method – 139

10.5 Concern Over the Timetable – 141

11. Divisions Among the Member States…143
11.1 Franco-German Proposals on Institutions – 143

11.2 The Sm alls Revolt – 148

11.3 Points of Attraction – 150

11.4 The Sm alls Organise – 151

11.5 The Impact of the Iraq Crisis – 153

12. The Praesidium Produces…157
12.1 The Draft Articles: An Overview – 157

12.2 Difficulties with Federalism and God – 160

12.3 Making Sense of Competences – 163

12.4 The Praesidium Under Pressure – 166

12.5 The Union's Instruments – 168

12.6 Protocols Clarify Subsidiarity and the Role of National
Parliaments – 169

12.7 The Area of Freedom, Security and Justice – 170

12.8 Union Finances – 174

12.9 The Democratic Life of the Union – 176

12.10 Union Membership – 178

12.11 The Union and Its Neighbours – 179

12.12 General and Final Provisions – 180

12.13 Pressure for a Referendum on Europe – 181

12.14 Union Leaders Decide Against Delay – 183

PART IV
The Convention End-Game
13. Institutional Imbroglio…189
13.1 G iscard's Articles – 190

13.2 Shocked Reactions – 194

13.3 The Praesidium Revisions – 195

13.4 Foreign Affairs and Defence – 201

13.5 A Basis for Further Work?9 – 205

13.6 Enhanced Cooperation Amid Continued Discord – 207

14. The Revised Draft Constitution…211
14.1 The End-M ay Texts – 212

14.2 The Revised Part I – 214

14.3 Common Foreign and Defence Proposals After Iraq – 219

14.4 Part II: The Charter of Fundamental Rights – 221

14.5 Part III: The Policies and Functioning of the Union – 221

14.6 Part IV: General and Final Provisions – 223

14.7 Giscard's Preamble – 223

15. Managing the Splits…225
15.1 Crisis in the Praesidium – 225

15.2 The European Commission: Missing in Action – 227

15.3 Britain Opts for a Single Text – 230

15.4 Giscard Prepares to Break Free – 233

16. Countdown to Consensus…235
16.1 Wednesday, 4 June – 235

16.2 Thursday, 5 June – 239

16.3 Friday, 6 June – 243

16.4 Countdown to Consensus: Week Two – 246

16.5 Wednesday, 11 June – 247

16.6 Thursday, 12 June – 251

16.7 Peace Breaks Out – 256

16.8 Verdicts at Thessaloniki – 259

17. The Convention after Thessaloniki…261
17.1 Tidying Up Part III – 261

17.2 The Last Two Days – 264

17.3 The Praesidium Meets for the Last Time – 267

17.4 Back from the Abyss – 270

17.5 The Ship Reaches Port – 273

17.6 Founding Fathers – 275

17.7 A Problematic Consensus – 277

PART V
Member States Agree a Constitution
18. The Intergovernmental Conference…283
18.1 The Italian Presidency – 283

18.2 Ireland Takes Over – 287

18.3 The Changes Wrought by the IGC – 294

19. The Challenge of Ratification…300
19.1 Britain and the IGC – 300

19.2 The UK Referendum – 304

19.3 The Ratification Challenge – 308

20. 'A Constitution for Europe'…313
20.1 An Accidental Constitution – 313

20.2 The Constitutional Treaty and the Citizen – 315

20.3 A More Efficient Union?… 320
20.4 A Treaty Rooted in Dualities – 323

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