The renaissance of legal science after the Middle Ages. The German Historical School no bird Phoenix. 16 essays.

The renaissance of legal science after the Middle Ages. The German Historical School no bird Phoenix. 16 essays.

The renaissance of legal science after the Middle Ages. The German Historical School no bird Phoenix. 16 essays.

Law of Europe > History of Law > Germanic law > Studies on sources (Quellenkunde)

Edition Details

  • Creator or Attribution (Responsibility): Ernst Andersen
  • Language: English
  • Jurisdiction(s): Denmark
  • Publication Information: København, Juristforbundet; distributed by Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague. 1974
  • Publication Type (Medium): History
  • Type: Book
  • Permalink: http://books.lawlegal.eu/the-renaissance-of-legal-science-after-the-middle-ages-the-german-historical-school-no-bird-phoenix-16-essays/ (Stable identifier)

Short Description

142 pages 24 cm

Purpose and Intended Audience

Useful for students learning an area of law, The renaissance of legal science after the Middle Ages. The German Historical School no bird Phoenix. 16 essays. is also useful for lawyers seeking to apply the law to issues arising in practice.

Research References

  • Providing references to further research sources: Search

More Options

Bibliographic information

  • Publishers: Juristforbundet ; distributed by Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague.
  • Publication Date: 1974
  • Country/State: Denmark
  • Number of Editions: 16 editions
  • First edition Date: 1974
  • Last edition Date: 1974
  • Languages: English, Danish
  • Library of Congress Code: KJ195
  • Dewey Code: 340.0943
  • ISBN: 8757426325 9788757426328
  • OCLC: 1206874

Main Contents

The German Historical School no bird Phoenix.–Bartolus sides with the papal absolutists.–The subsidiarity of Justinian Roman law to custom law and statute law.–Justinian Roman law jus commune in Christian countries.–The growing interest in antejustinian Roman law from the first half of the 16th century.–Publishing of Ansegisus, Benedictus Levita, lex Salica, lex Burgundionum and lex Saxonum.–Publication of lex Visigothorum.–Reconstruction of Codex Theodosianus.–Three writing of antejustinian jurists appear.–Reconstruction of the Twelve Tables.–The beginning of the study of classical Roman law.–Jean Bodin's reasoning away of the idea of the Germans as the Romans' successors.–Antitribonian.–A systematizer of Justinian Roman private law.–Satan and witches disappear from the juridical forum.–French practitioners' work on the custom law of the realm.–Postcript.

Structured Subjects (Headings):

Unstructured Subjects (Headings):

Leave a comment